Dr. Ronald Willy

Dr. Ronald Willy

Dr. Ronald Willy

Radiologist
U.S. Navy


As a JV in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1990, working for
a local community-organizing group as well as at a
homeless shelter for men in Immaculate Conception
Church, Dr. Ronald Willy, a Marquette graduate, had no
ambition to enter medical school. He also never thought he
would join the military.

“It was just the opposite,” said Willy, who also worked for two
years on the staff of JVC. “I was anti-military.”

Willy is now a radiologist stationed with the U.S. Navy
in Okinawa, Japan. He joined the Navy for the medical
scholarship and initially planned to be an ophthalmologist,
but a severe color vision deficiency in his own eyesight forced
him to choose another specialty or leave clinical medicine
altogether. He trained in radiology and spends his working
hours looking at x-rays and CT and MRI scans at a hospital
he compared to a U.S. community hospital for active duty
military, their families and local retirees.

“I think the most important component of JVC that I take
with me into the hospital every day is the priority of
individual dignity and worth,” he said. “The work of
JVC volunteers forces them to encounter, interact and
ultimately (hopefully) truly know individual people
who have been disregarded or disenfranchised. This
human contact should foster a greater desire for
justice. In medicine, similar encounters happen, when
physicians meet patients who are ill or unwell; and this
human contact and interaction usually fosters the quest
for diagnosis and treatment. JVC and medicine are
similar in that they both strive to respect the primacy,
and foster the dignity of individual human beings.”